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Taken on 04/14/09
This building and location was suggested by Hope M. of Perceptionphotography.biz
Mark Hopkins House, Henderson Harbor.  Demolished.
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Comments from visitors:
From Hope M. of Perceptionphotography.biz- "This historic relic from the early days of Henderson Harbor, The Mark Hopkins House is abandoned and will most likely be demolished in the future. Today it is called the Mark Hopkins Performing Arts Center but it was actually built by his uncle Jesse Hopkins. The history of the large yellow building near the harbor is vast and varied. It was built in 1812 for use as a school house and also served as a place of religious worship. Jesse Hopkins, was by trade was a silversmith, and for several years was in business before he came to Jefferson County in 1805. He was the land agent of wealthy land speculator William Henderson(for whom the town is named). Jesse worked long and hard to promote settlement and prosperity in the area. At the first town meeting and election in 1811, Jesse was made Supervisor, his brother Mark Sr. was made Town Clerk. The elder Mark Hopkins created a legacy for his family with his achievements at Henderson. When a post-office was established, Mark Hopkins Sr. was the post master. He was Captain of Volunteers in the War of 1812 and state representative. He moved the family to St. Clair, Michigan in 1824 and was Judge of Probate and Postmaster there. Mark Hopkins Jr. was born Sept 1. 1813 in Henderson, he was a lad when his family moved to Michigan. Later he would make his fortune as one of four principal investors who formed the Central Pacific Railroad in 1861. Mark Hopkins Jr. along with Leland Stanford, Charles Crocker, and Collis Huntington were know as "The Big Four". The famed Rev. Orson Pratt often preached Mormon doctrine at the “yellow meeting house".  Pratt was one of the original 12 apostles of the Mormon Church. Over the years the large wooden building has been a school, meeting house, store, hotel, bar, and in more recent years a fine dining Restaurant."
 

Taken on 04/14/09
Mark Hopkins House, Henderson Harbor
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Comments from visitors:
On 4/30/13 Anne writes "This beautiful old house has been demolished, and something new has taken its place. Such is life."

Taken in April, 2009
Closer view.
(The above photo was taken by
Hope M. of Perceptionphotography.biz)
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Taken on 04/14/09
This building and location was suggested by Hope M. of Perceptionphotography.biz
Near the corner of Overbluff Road and Wilder Road, Depauville.
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Comments from visitors:
From Hope M. - "I have determined this is The Tracey Farm listed on Nat'l Reg. Historic Places." 

Taken in April, 2009 by by Hope M. of Perceptionphotography.biz
Another shot
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Taken on 04/14/09
Falling down building, Route 8
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Taken on 04/14/09
These old fuel tanks usually aren't what I include on this site, but a number of people have said that these tanks have been sitting here unused for many years.
Webmaster update 04/08/2010 - These have been taken out and the base demolished.
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Comments from visitors:
Don writes: "These were home heating oil tanks for GA Jumps fuel and hardware. I believe they were used up to the '60's another set of newer tanks was located down the street, The business was located in what is now an apartment building in Dexter."

Taken on 04/22/09
Old barn, Massey Street Road (County Route 75)
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Comments from visitors:
From CW8647 (via Flickr.com): "I shot this barn a couple of years ago. It is a very interesting structure, isn't it?"
Rusty W. writes "This is a farm that used to be owned by the Parks family. The original house was destroyed by fire, and a modern home replaced it." 

This photo was used in artwork on this page.